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Fecal Sanctuary


San Francisco Is A Literal S***hole, Public Defecation Map Reveals

There is an ongoing debate currently going on in the country about what locations can be classified as shitholes. The debate sprung from a report that Donald Trump referred to some third world countries as “shitholes” in a meeting with lawmakers last week.

While the debate might rage on as to what constitutes a “shithole” of a country, one thing is not up for debate: the American city of San Francisco is a shithole.

We know this thanks to an interactive map created in 2014 called Human Wasteland.

The map charts all of the locations for human excrement “incidents” reported to the San Francisco police during a given month. The interactive map shows precise locations of the incidents by marking them with poop emojis:

San Francisco has a major shithole problem

San Francisco has a major public defecation ‘shithole’ problem. Image via The Daily Caller

The project shows that the heat map for poo is most heavily concentrated directly in downtown San Francisco.

According to the SF Weekly, San Francisco has a major shithole problem:

St. George Alley can harbor up to 30 piles of poop per week, Department of Public Works employee Steve Mahoney told SFist. That’s exceptional. But it also illustrates a seemingly intractable problem in a city with limited public restrooms, constricted homeless services, and a line of filthy JCDecaux bunker toilets that often sit unused.

So if you live in San Francisco and are offended by Trump’s (alleged) comments, (and have contracted the latest media-induced  fecal obsession disorder) just watch where you’re stepping.

[Byline Benny Johnson]

15 January 2018
The Daily Caller (edited)

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Strong M7.1 Seismic Event: Near Coast of Acarí, Arequipa, South-central Peru


The earthquake occurred in Peru5km near the coast, Department of Arequipa (population 1,079,500). Nearby places:  Lomas, Peru, 25.4 km (15.8 mi) SSE; Minas de Marcona, Peru, 73.1 km (45.5 mi) SSE; Nazca, Peru, 106.9 km (66.4 mi) S; Puquio, Peru, 137.6 km (85.5 mi) SSW; Ica, Peru, 216.2 km (134.3 mi) SSE.

Event Map M 7.3 - 42km SSW of Acari, Peru

Event Map: M 7.1 – 42km SSW of Acari, Peru on Sunday, 2018-01-14 at 09:18:41 UTC . This is a product of the GEOFON Extended Virtual Network (GEVN) and credit belongs to all involved institutions.

Additional information about this event
Epicenter location in Google Maps

Recent Earthquakes Near Acarí, Arequipa, Peru

IRIS- MWW7.3 Near Coast Of Peru
IRIS Interactive Earthquake Browser

M 7.1 in Peru on 14 Jan 2018 09:18 UTC Overview of resources available in GDACS for this event


South America –  Peru | Offshore/Coastal Area, Department of Arequipa
Location: 40km SSW of Acari, Peru
Magnitude: 7.1
Time: 2018-01-14 at 09:18:41 UTC .
Epicenter: 15°46’33.6″S 74°44’38.4″W
Depth: 36.3 km (22.5 mi) (Deep)
Population: About 41,000 people within 100km
Area affected by Minimal damage (estimated radius): 100 km (MMI VII)
There is a low likelihood of casualties. Yellow alert for economic losses. Some damage is possible and the impact should be relatively localized.
NEIC us2000cjfy


Tsunami Alert

The maximum Tsunami wave height is  0.2m in Chavina, Peru. This height is estimated for 14-Jan-2018 09:28:58.

...PTWC TSUNAMI THREAT MESSAGE...WEPA40 PHEB 140959 TSUPAC
TSUNAMI INFORMATION STATEMENT: WEHW42 PHEB 140927 TIBHWX

Pacific Tsunami Warning Center  Hawai, USA

Population

484 km SE of Lima, Peru / pop: 7,738,000 / local time: 04:18:45.1 2018-01-14
220 km SE of Ica, Peru / pop: 247,000 / local time: 04:18:45.1 2018-01-14
29 km S of Acarí, Peru / pop: 4,500 / local time: 04:18:45.1 2018-01-14


More information
Universidad de Chile, Dep. de Geofisica, Chile
Instituto Geofísico del Perú Lima, Peru
USGS/NEIC Denver, USA
GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam, Germany
IRIS Event Based Product Query
Earthquake Track
Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (JRC)


== PRELIMINARY EARTHQUAKE REPORT ==

Orange alert: earthquake M 7.1 in Peru on 1/14/2018 9:18:42 AM
By Newsroom America Feeds at 4:29 am Eastern

Population Density near epicenter (people/km2). Image area: 6×4 decimal degrees (approx. 650x450km2). Summary

This earthquake is expected to have a medium humanitarian impact based on the magnitude and the affected population and their vulnerability.

Earthquake Magnitude: M7.1Depth: 10 Km Event Date UTC: 14 Jan 2018 09:18 Exposed Population: About 53000 people within 100km

Whether international humanitarian aid is needed must be decided by an expert.

See the GDACS website for live news coverage (including OCHA Situation Reports), the full earthquake report

For information on emergency response, please consult the GDACS Virtual OSOCC.

Earthquake Event Impact Details

The earthquake happened off shore, near Peru, Department of Arequipa (population 1,079,500). The distance to the nearest coast is 5km. The nearest places are Yauca (10km), Chaviña (10km), Tanaca (16km), Chipchipa (19km), Cancino (20km), and 36 more.

The following vulnerable infrastructure is nearby and may be affected.

For logistics, the following access points are nearby. The nearest airports are Yauca (runway 4500ft, 14km), and San Juan de Marcona (runway 6500ft, 68km). The nearest ports are San Juan (70km), and San Nicolas (83km).

The population near the earthquake is shown in the table below.

Radius Population Density (people/km2) Affected with damage 200 km 290000 people 2 100 km 53000 people 1 Likely 75 km 24000 people 1 Very likely 50 km 10000 people 1 Very likely 20 km 1100 people 0 Very likely 10 km <1000 people 0 Very likely Disclaimer

While we try everything to ensure accuracy, this information is purely indicative and should not be used for any decision making without alternate sources of information. The JRC is not responsible for any damage or loss resulting from the use of the information presented on this website. Please refer to the GDACS website for subscribing or unsubscribing from the earthquake alert email or SMS service.

Joint Initiative of the United Nations and the European Commission Email created automatically at 14 Jan 2018 09:28 UTC. Reproduction authorised provided the source is acknowledged.
©European Commission 2004-2018


Tectonic Summary (USGS)

The January 14, 2018, M 7.1 earthquake offshore southern Peru occurred as the result of shallow thrust faulting on or near the boundary between the South America plate and the subducting Nazca plate. The Nazca plate subducts beneath the South America plate at the Peru-Chile Trench offshore of western South America, 80 km to the southwest of today’s earthquake, and dips east-northeast beneath the South American continent. At the location of the January 14, 2018 earthquake, the Nazca plate moves to the east-northeast with respect to the South America plate at a velocity of about 70 mm/yr. The location, depth and focal mechanism solution of today’s earthquake are consistent with it occurring on the megathrust interface between the two plates.

While commonly plotted as points on maps, earthquakes of this size are more appropriately described as slip over a larger fault area. Thrust-faulting events of the size of the January 14, 2018 earthquake are typically about 50×25 km (length x width).

The plate boundary region between the Nazca and South America plates experiences a large number of earthquakes. The region within 250 km of the epicenter of the January 14 earthquake has experienced 13 previous earthquakes of M 6.5+ over the preceding century. The largest of these, the M 8.4 earthquake of June 23, 2001, occurred along the plate boundary 130 km to the southeast (and ruptured from there ~ 200 km to the southeast). It resulted in at least 74 fatalities and destroyed more than 17,000 homes. The epicenter of the M 7.7 earthquake of November 12, 1996, is about 130 km to the northwest of today’s earthquake. That event ruptured much of the megathrust between its epicenter and the epicenter of the January 14, 2018 earthquake, and resulted in at least 14 fatalities and left 12,000 people homeless. The September 25, 2013, M 7.1 earthquake, just 25 km to the southeast of today’s event, is not known to have caused any fatalities.

“One of these things is not like the other, One of these things just doesn’t belong,”


Can you tell which thing is not like the other?

Why is that?

See Also

New Maps: Which country has the most open defecation in the world?

Sometimes, you have to visit a ‘shithole’ to see what’s in it …


The simplest explanation is usually the correct one. ~ Occam’s razor

Shithole (noun): An extremely dirty, shabby, or otherwise unpleasant place.

Changing the name, does not change the problem. It’s simply a matter of  “political correctness” being forcefully abused at the moment.

‘Make America Mexico Again’ and other Stories

Large sewage spill in Tijuana, Mexico, flows north of border

A certain level of crime is needed to keep politicians in power. — The Center For American Progress (CAP) Action Fund circulated a memo calling illegal immigrants brought here at a young age — so-called “Dreamers” — a “critical component of the Democratic Party’s future electoral success.” – A Plan To Use Foreigners To Influence American Election Outcomes

Mexico's scenic highway vista views.

Mexico’s scenic highway vistas. Flying the Mexican National Flag. Image: 3.bp.blogspot.com

Mexico's counsil on gun control

Welcome to Aztlan: Mexico’s council on gun control. Image: i.telegraph.co.uk


AZ Anti-Trump Protester: ‘Make America Mexico Again’

Make America Mexico Again’ Image: Breitbart – 2016 : The Race


"Here's your sign."

Amnesty Virus – Weaponizing Immigrants — The Change you’ve been waiting for? “Aquí está su señal”



Mexico Travel Warnings

Mexico Travel Advisory
January 10, 2018

Mexico – Level 2: Exercise increased caution

Exercise increased caution in Mexico due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Violent crime, such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery, is widespread.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico as U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to these areas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from intercity travel after dark in many areas of Mexico. U.S. government employees are also not permitted to drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico with the exception of daytime travel on Highway 15 between Nogales and Hermosillo.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

Do not travel to:

    • Colima state due to crime.
    • Guerrero state due to crime.
    • Michoacán state due to crime.
    • Sinaloa state due to crime.
    • Tamaulipas state due to crime.

For all other states in Mexico, please see detailed information below.

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

    • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving at night.
    • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
    • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
    • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
    • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
    • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
    • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Mexico.
    • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Aguascalientes state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities at night. Additionally, U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Aguascalientes.

Baja California state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to the Baja California State Secretariat for Public Security, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

Due to poor cellular service and hazardous road conditions, U.S. government employees are only permitted to travel on “La Rumorosa” between Mexicali and Tijuana on the toll road during daylight.

There are no U.S. government restrictions in tourist areas in Baja California, which includes: Ensenada, Rosarito, and Tijuana.

Baja California Sur state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

There are no U.S. government restrictions for travel in Baja California Sur, which includes the tourist areas of Cabo San Lucas, San Jose del Cabo, and La Paz.

Campeche state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Chiapas state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees in tourist areas in Chiapas state, such as: Palenque, San Cristobal de las Casas, and Tuxtla Gutierrez.

Chihuahua state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

    • Ciudad Juarez: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel after dark west of Eje Juan Gabriel and south of Boulevard Zaragoza. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the areas southeast of Boulevard Independencia and the Valle de Juarez region.
    • Within the city of Chihuahua: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the Morelos, Villa, and Zapata districts.
    • Ojinaga: U.S. government employees must travel via U.S. Highway 67 through the Presidio, Texas port-of-entry.
    • Palomas and the Nuevo Casas Grandes/Paquime region: U.S. government employees must use U.S. Highway 11 through the Columbus, New Mexico port-of- entry.
    • Nuevo Casas Grandes: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel outside city limits after dark.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Coahuila state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Local law enforcement has limited capability to prevent and respond to crime, particularly in the northern part of the state.

U.S. government employees are not permitted to travel in Coahuila state, with the exception of Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente. U.S. government employees can only travel to those cities using the most direct routes and maximizing the use of toll highways. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, or Parras de la Fuente.

U.S. government employees are permitted to travel to Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuna but they must travel to these cities from the United States only.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Coahuila.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Colima state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to Tecoman or within 12 miles of the Colima-Michoacán border and on Route 110 between La Tecomaca and the Jalisco border.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees travel along Route 200 from the Jalisco border to Manzanillo, including the Manzanillo airport.  There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in Manzanillo from Marina Puerto Santiago to Playa las Brisas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Colima.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Durango state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity along the highways are common.

U.S. government employees may travel outside the city of Durango only during daylight on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Durango city.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Durango.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Estado de Mexico state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is common in parts of Estado de Mexico.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the following municipalities, unless they are traveling directly through the municipalities on major thoroughfares:

    • Coacalco
    • Ecatepec
    • Nezahualcoyotl
    • La Paz
    • Valle del Chalco
    • Solidaridad
    • Chalco
    • Ixtapaluca
    • Tlatlaya

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads between Morelos, Huitzilac, and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Guanajuato state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Guerrero state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the entire state of Guerrero, including Acapulco.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Hidalgo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Jalisco state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to areas bordering Michoacán and Zacatecas states. U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities after dark and from using Highway 80 between Cocula and La Huerta.

U.S. government employees may use federal toll road 15D for travel to Mexico City. However, they may not stop in the towns of La Barca or Ocotlan for any reason.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Jalisco.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in the following tourist areas in Jalisco state: Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, Chapala, and Ajijic.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Mexico City – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Michoacán state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in Michoacán state, with the exception of Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas cities and the area north of federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel by land, except on federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees may fly into Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Morelos state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads from Huitzilac to Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nayarit state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nayarit state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state, with the following exceptions:

    • Riviera Nayarit (which includes Nuevo Vallarta and Bahia de Banderas)
    • Santa Maria del Oro
    • Xalisco

When traveling to permitted areas above, U.S. government employees must use major highways and cannot travel between cities after dark.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nayarit.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nuevo Leon state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nuevo Leon state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Monterrey only during daylight on toll roads, with the exception of travel to the Monterrey airport, which is permitted at any time.

U.S. government employees must remain within San Pedro Garza Garcia or Santa Catarina (south of the Santa Catarina river) municipalities between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nuevo Leon.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Oaxaca state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

In Oaxaca, U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on Highway 200 throughout the state, except to transit between the airport in Huatulco to hotels in Puerto Escondido and Huatulco.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the El Istmo region. The El Istmo region is defined by Highway 185D to the west, Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca/Chiapas border to the east and includes the towns of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas.

Puebla state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Queretaro state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Quintana Roo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents injuring or killing bystanders have occurred.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Quintana Roo state, which includes tourist areas such as: Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Tulum, and the Riviera Maya.

San Luis Potosi state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of San Luis Potosi state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside San Luis Potosi city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within San Luis Potosi city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in San Luis Potosi.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sinaloa state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based and operating in Sinaloa state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state. In areas where travel is permitted, the following restrictions are in place:

    • Mazatlan: U.S. government travel is permitted only in Zona Dorada, the historic town center, and direct routes to and from these locations and the airport or the cruise ship terminal.
    • Los Mochis and Port Topolobampo: U.S. government travel is permitted within the city and the port, as well as direct routes to and from these locations and the airport.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sonora state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Sonora is a key location utilized by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. However, northern Sonora experiences much lower levels of crime than cities closer to Sinaloa and other parts of Mexico. U.S. government employees visiting Puerto Peñasco must use the Lukeville/Sonoyta crossing, and they are required to travel during daylight hours on main roads.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to:

    • The triangular region west of Nogales, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar.
    • The eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and state Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16).
    • South of Hermosillo, with the exception of the cities of Alamos, San Carlos, Guaymas, and Empalme.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tabasco state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Tamaulipas state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion, and sexual assault, is common. Gang activity, including gun battles, is widespread. Armed criminal groups target public and private passenger buses traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers hostage and demanding ransom payments. Local law enforcement has limited capability to respond to violence in many parts of the state.

U.S. government employees are subject to movement restrictions and a curfew between midnight and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Tamaulipas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tlaxcala state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Veracruz state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

Yucatan state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Yucatan state, which includes tourist areas such as: Chichen Itza, Merida, Uxmal, and Valladolid.

Zacatecas state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Zacatecas state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Zacatecas city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within Zacatecas city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Zacatecas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.


See Also

Mexico’s Drug War Diary

“Islamic Refugee” With Gas Pipeline Plans Arrested in New Mexico Border County


Flashback

“Tell ‘em what you want them to hear. The Truth doesn’t matter. Just persuade them that things are good.” –The Propagandists Creed

https://i0.wp.com/humanitarian.worldconcern.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/humanitarian-asia-bangladesh-dump2.jpg

https://i0.wp.com/media.philstar.com/images/the-philippine-star/business/business-main/20140705/poverty-3.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/82/38/b1/8238b123dba92cf0c245c519fab4d684.jpg

Haiti’s Progress

Politically preferred Third World Immigrants

Politically preferred Third World Immigrants: America as a Toxic Third World dump site: Politically preferred Third World Immigrants . Image: gatesofvienna.net

Obama et al., didn’t show a willingness to rescue Christian refugees. However, he did Secretly plant  up to 75,000 Syrian Muslims in U.S.Jihad is not caused by Poverty or Ignorance

Feds: 30% surge in illegals losing DACA freedom for crimes, gang violence

At Least 2,139 DACA Recipients Convicted or Accused of Crimes Against Americans

Nearly Quarter Of Undocumented Immigrants Have Mental Disorder, Study Finds

Destitute migrants from throughout the Middle East and Africa often arrive with nothing but the clothes on their backs — a destructive culture in their heads, and Third World invasive diseases in their bodies, which often include highly infectious “superbugs.”

“Scared Muslim migrant” runs over innocent U.S. university students and subsequently attacks them with a machete. — Ohio State students and faculty pushed hard for more Islamic immigration


Making Mogadishu

Somalia remains under a U.S. travel ban due to its present terrorist-threat status to the United States and its citizens.

Somalis are among largest group of foreign nationals arrested on terrorism-related charges in the U.S., according to the Senate report.

Muslim Refugee Rapes 10 Year-Old Girl In Minneapolis Good Question: Why Did Somalis Locate Here?

…The United States has admitted about 84,000 Somali refugees. Close to 40 percent live in Minnesota. The institutions of this state, private or public, have an important place in the mind of Somalis,

“Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.” –Party slogan, “1984”

Atrocious indoctrination
atrocious indoctrination

“Dreamers” regulating the genetic constitution of their children.

https://westernrifleshooters.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/c3sztvuuoaaw78q.jpg?w=410&h=222

Let us not forget, there is nothing “radical” about the historical norms of Islamic orthodoxy.  The behavior of these Muslim terrorists are completely in adherence with the teachings of the Koran and the Hadiths.

Image result for tlarremore

Muslim Dreamer’s Outreach

“Migration is a method with which to dilute the current European countries, to create a sort of docile mass that will become the future new European.   This is what dictators in the past always wanted, the Hitlers and Stalins.  The collectivity of European elites is doing the same evil as that done by the individuals in the past.” Former Czech Republic President Vaclav Klaus.

“If we do not protect our own people we will become weak, and we will face more mass killings of this kind when they grow to outnumber us.” —Wirathu, Burmese Buddhist monk

Solzhenitsyn on bolsheviks

In 1917 Vladimir Lenin an employee of Rothschild over throws The Russian Monarchy starting USSR Communism’s Centralization – Political Vel Craft.

Collective phenomena are less sensitive to correction than individual phenomena. Because it is widely shared by identification, collective delusion is less amendable to correction than individual self-deceit.

“Through clever and constant application of propaganda, people can be made to see paradise as hell, and also the other way round, to consider the most wretched sort of life as paradise.” –Adolf Hitler


Shit hole

A horrible place that is considered (by the majority of sane members of the human species) completely undesirable to live, work, or play in. Most often, but not always, shit holes smell real bad as a result of garbage, animal and/or human excrement, open sewage and the like. Hence, the origin of the term.

A shit hole is nearly completely devoid of any advanced cultural, economic, or career opportunities. Shit holes are boring, stale, and are not conducive to productive activities aside from foot travel, foraging, and maybe, milking the occasional goat. Shit holes generally consist of primitive rural areas or they are small villages or towns where the citizens — being unused to actual amenities of civilization — often delude themselves into thinking that they live in a major metropolitan area just because they spend time every other day or so stuck in refuse and traffic with their ox carts, as their chieftains or the village elders can’t or won’t do anything about it.

People that live in shit holes may or may not be well-intentioned — but almost all of them are woefully ignorant — believing in superstitions and unfounded stereotypes regarding those that live in more diverse, exciting areas of the world. These shit hole dwellers often detest and are offended by activities partaken by western folk (such as dancing, eating ethnic foods, participating in festivals, sports, or visiting museums) preferring instead to milk their goats or put their lives in danger by obliviously running headfirst into ethnic cleansing areas inhabited by wild animals or terrorists just to randomly scoop up a petty bag of food rations. Due to their severe lack of worldly exposure, shit hole dwellers not only have gross misconceptions and prejudices regarding city dwellers, but anybody who is different from them (be it on the basis of religion, tribe, nationality, creed, or skin color).

Scientists are still trying to explain why such a large percentage of the human population would willingly choose to harm themselves and loved ones by inner and over-breeding and opting to live in these shit holes. A promising hypothesis that attempts to explain this most irrational behavior is that shit hole dwellers are willing to forgo security and pursue the rewarding career of joining a cartel and being executed by their cohorts in, or near an exciting major city, while continuing to live in familiar primitive outdoor conditions. When asked why they would do this, respondents answered.. “It’s because quasi-religious leaders or prophets, or our tribal leaders/drug lords tells us what to do if we want to stay alive.” To test this radical hypothesis, leading scientists from U.S. and European Universities and the U.N., plan to administer I.Q. tests to several groups of shit hole residents as a first step in testing for devolution while extorting and securing grant monies to justify their jobs and maintain their comfortable existence.

An edited excerpt from Urban Dictionary

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“You can only judge a shithole by the turds that pass through it.”

https://tlarremore.files.wordpress.com/2016/05/c3ba2-ows2bcrap2bon2bflag.jpg?w=311&h=320

Applied Liberalism – ‘Making America a Shithole’

The Usual Suspects

Media Meltdown over Trump’s S-Word: ‘Nazi,’ ‘Evil,’ ‘KKK,’ ‘Terrorist Sympathizer

Global Warming – got proof? – Well, It’s all in the math, stupid ….


How to Deceive with Statistics: Distortions Due to Diminutive Denominators

We all learned in elementary school that “you can’t divide by zero.” But what happens when you divide by a number very close to zero, a small fraction? The quotient shoots way up to a very large value.

Pick any number. If you divide 27 by 1, you get 27. If you divide 27 by 0.1, you get 270. Divide 27 by 0.001, and you get 27,000. And so on. Any such division exercise blows up to a huge result as the denominator gets closer and closer to zero.

There are several indices being cited these days that get people’s attention because of the big numbers displayed. But the reality is that those particular big numbers come entirely from having very small denominators when calculating a ratio. Three prominent examples of this mathematical artifact are the feedback effect in global warming models, the “Global Warming Potential,” and the “Happy Planet Index.” Each of these is afflicted by the enormous distortion that results when a denominator is small.

The “Happy Planet Index” is the easiest to explain. It is used to compare different countries and is formed by the combination of

(a x b x c) / d.

In this equation,

a = well-being – “how satisfied the residents of each country feel with life overall” (based on a Gallup poll)

b = life expectancy

c = inequalities of outcomes (“the inequalities between people within a country in terms of how long they live, and how happy they feel, based on the distribution in each country’s life expectancy and well-being data”)

d =  ecological footprint (“the average impact that each resident of a country places on the environment, based on data prepared by the Global Footprint Network”)

How do the assorted countries come out? Using this index, Costa Rica with a score of 44.7 is number 1; Mexico with a score of 40.7 is number 2; Bangladesh with a score of 38.4 is number 8; Venezuela with a score of 33.6 is 29; and the USA with a score of 20.7 is number 108 – out of 140 countries considered.

Beyond such obvious questions as “Why are so many people from Mexico coming to the USA while almost none are going the other way?,” it is instructive to look at the role of the denominator (factor d) in arriving at those numerical index values.

Any country with a very low level of economic activity will have a low value of “ecological footprint.” Uninhabited jungle or barren desert scores very low in that category. With a very small number for factor (d), it doesn’t make a whole lot of difference what the numbers for (a), (b), and (c) are; the tiny denominator guarantees that the quotient will be large. Hence the large index reported for some truly squalid places.

The underlying reason why the “Happy Planet Index” is so misleading is because it includes division by a number that for some countries gets pretty close to zero.

Global Warming Potential

The second example of this effect is the parameter “Global Warming Potential,” which is used to compare the relative strength of assorted greenhouse gases. The misuse of numbers here has led to all sorts of dreadful predictions about the need to do away with trace gases like methane (CH4), N2O, and others.

Global Warming Potential” was first introduced in the IPCC’s second assessment report and later formalized by the IPCC in its Fourth Assessment Report of 2007 (AR-4). It is described in section 2.10.2 of the text by Working Group 1. To grasp what it means, it is first necessary to understand how molecules absorb and re-emit radiation.

Every gas absorbs radiation in certain spectral bands. The more of a gas is present, the more it absorbs. Nitrogen (N2), 77% of the atmosphere, absorbs in the near-UV part of the spectrum, but not in the visible or infrared range. Water vapor (H2O) is a sufficiently strong absorber in the infrared that it causes the greenhouse effect and warms the Earth by over 30˚C, making our planet much more habitable. In places where little water vapor is present, there is less absorption, less greenhouse effect, and it soon gets cold (think of nighttime in the desert).

Once a molecule absorbs a photon, it gains energy and goes into an excited state. Until that energy is lost (via re-radiation or collisions), that molecule won’t absorb another photon. A consequence of this is that the total absorption by any gas gradually saturates as the amount of that gas increases. A tiny amount of a gas absorbs very effectively, but if the amount is doubled, the total absorption will be less than twice as much as at first and similarly if doubled again and again. We say the absorption has logarithmic dependence on the concentration of the particular gas. The curve of how total absorption falls off varies according to the exponential function, exp (-X/A), where X is the amount of a gas present (typically expressed in parts per million, ppm), and A is a constant related to the physics of the molecule. Each gas will have a different value, denoted B, C, D, etc. Getting these numbers within ±15% is considered pretty good.

There is so much water vapor in the atmosphere (variable, above 10,000 ppm, or 1% in concentration) that its absorption is completely saturated, so there’s not much to discuss. By contrast, the gas CO2 is a steady value of about 400 ppm, and its absorption is about 98% saturated. That coincides with the coefficient A being roughly equivalent to 100 ppm.

This excursion into the physics of absorption pays off when we look at the mathematics that goes into calculating the “Global Warming Potential” (GWP) of a trace gas. GWP is defined in terms of the ratio of the slopes of the absorption curves for two gases: specifically, the slope for the gas of interest divided by the slope for carbon dioxide. The slope of any curve is the first derivative of that curve. Economists speak of the “marginal” change in a function. For a change of 1 ppm in the concentration, what is the change in the radiative efficiency?

At this point, it is crucial to observe that every other gas is compared to CO2 to determine its GWP value. In other words, whatever GWP value is determined for CO2, that value is reset equal to 1 so that the calculation of GWP for a gas produces a number compared to CO2. The slope of the absorption curve for CO2 becomes the denominator of the calculation to find the GWP of every other gas.

Now let’s calculate that denominator. When the absorption function is exp (-X/A), it is a mathematical fact that the first derivative = [-1/A][exp(-X/A)]. In the case of CO2 concentration being 400 ppm, when A = 100 ppm, that slope is [-1/100][exp (-4)] = – 0.000183. That is one mighty flat curve, with an extremely gentle slope that is slightly negative.

Next, examine the gas that’s to be compared with CO2, and calculate the numerator.

It bears mentioning that the calculation of GWP also contains a factor related to the atmospheric lifetime of each gas. Here we’ll concentrate on the change in absorption due to a small change in concentration. The slope of the absorption curve will be comparatively steep, because that molecule is at low concentration, able to catch all the photons that come its way.

To be numerically specific, consider methane (CH4), with an atmospheric concentration of about Y = 1.7 ppm, or N2O, at concentration Z = 0.3 ppm. Perhaps their numerical coefficients are B ~ 50 or C ~ 150; they won’t be terribly far from the value of A for CO2. Taking the first derivative gives [-1/B][exp{-Y/B)]. Look at this closely: with Y or Z so close to zero, the exponential factor will be approximately 1, so the derivative is just 1/B (or 1/C, etc.). Maybe that number is 1/50 or 1/150 – but it won’t be as small as 0.000183, the CO2 slope that appears in the denominator.

In fact, the denominator (the slope of the CO2 curve as it nears saturation) is guaranteed to be a factor of about [exp (-4)] smaller than the numerator 7 – for the very simple reason that there is ~ 400 times as much CO2 present, and its job of absorbing photons is nearly all done.

When a normal-sized numerator is divided by a tiny denominator, the quotient blows up. The GWP for assorted gases come out to very large numbers, like 25 for CH4 and 300 for N2O. The atmospheric lifetime factor swings some of these numbers around still farther: some of the hydrofluorocarbons (trade name Freon) have gigantic GWPs. HFC-134a, used in most auto air conditioners, winds up with GWP above 1,300. The IPCC suggests an error bracket of ±35% on these estimates. However, the reality is that every one of the GWPs calculated is enormously inflated due to division by the extremely small denominator associated with the slope of the CO2 absorption curve.

The calculation of GWP is not so much a warning about other gases, but rather an indictment of CO2, which (at 400 ppm) would not change its absorption perceptibly if CO2 concentration increased or decreased by 1 ppm.

The Feedback Effect of Global Warming

The third example comes from the estimates of the “feedback effect” in computational models of global warming. The term “Climate Sensitivity” expresses how much the temperature will rise if the greenhouse gas CO2 doubles in concentration. A relevant parameter in the calculation is “radiative forcing,” which can be treated either with or without feedback effects associated with water vapor in the atmosphere. Setting aside a lot of details, the “no feedback” case involves a factor l that characterizes the strength of the warming effect of CO2. But with feedback, that factor changes to [ l /(1 – bl)], where b is the sum of assorted feedback terms, such as reflection of radiation from clouds and other physical mechanisms. Each of those is assigned a numerical quantity. The value of l tends to be around 0.3. The collected sum of the feedback terms is widely variable and hotly debated, but in the computational models used by the IPCC in prior years, the value of b tended to be about 2.8.

Notice that as l is at 1/3 and b is at 3, the denominator is at zero. For the particular case of l = 0.3 and b = 2.8, the denominator is 0.16, and the “feedback factor” becomes 6.25. It was that small denominator and consequent exaggerated feedback factor that increased the estimate of “Climate Sensitivity” from under 1˚C in the no-feedback case to alarmingly large estimates of temperature change. Some newspapers spoke of “11˚F increases in global temperatures.” Nobody paid attention to the numerical details.

In more recent years, the study of various positive and negative contributions to feedback improved, and the value of the sum b dropped to about 1, reducing the feedback factor to about 1.4. The value of the “Climate Sensitivity” estimated 30 years ago in the “Charney Report” was 3˚C ± 1.5˚C. Today, the IPCC gingerly speaks of projected Climate Sensitivity being “near the lower end of the range.” That sobering revision can be traced to the change from a tiny denominator to a normal denominator.

The take-home lesson in all of this is to beware of tiny denominators. Any numerical factor that is cranked out is increasingly meaningless as the denominator shrinks.

When some parameter (such as “Climate Sensitivity” or “Global Warming Potential” or “Happy Planet Index”) has built into it a small denominator, don’t believe it. Such parameters have no meaning or purpose other than generating alarm and headlines.

[Byline Thomas P. Sheahen]

11 January 2018
American Thinker (edited)

Getting the education you pay for … or not.


Major Waste

Way back in the tyranny of Bush the Minor, I read a funny article in one of the news magazines, while waiting for a haircut. This was in the early days of his administration when the accounting scandals hit and the tech bubble burst tanked the economy. The liberal media was sure it was all the result of the gods being angry over Bush getting elected over Gore, so they filled their pages with horror stories about the economy. The story was a tale of woe about Ivy League grads unable to find work.

The one example I always remember was about a girl who had graduated from Harvard and was unable to find a job she deserved. Instead she was reduced to waiting tables (gasp!) and doing temp work in offices. The story went through her struggles to get interviews and her process of considering alternative career options. Finally she landed a job as a social worker for the city. The piece wrapped up with a quick summary of her story and it was revealed that she had majored in folklore at Harvard.

Whenever the topic of college majors comes up, I always think of that story. I’ve made a hobby of rooting around in the course catalogs of liberal arts colleges, looking for bizarre classes and majors. Nothing so far has topped the Harvard Folklore and Mythology degree. Our colleges are full of lunatics doing useless work, of course, but there is some effort to dress it up as legitimate academic work. There’s no way to dress up a major in folklore. Exactly no one has ever said in an emergency, “We need a folklorist!”

Anyway, this post on Greg Cochran’s site brought all that to mind. His post links to this cool graphic put together by NPR displaying the majors over time, relative to other majors and college graduates as a whole. It’s one of those things that could be done with charts or traditional graphs, but it is a lot more fun hovering over that thing. I learned that there is such a thing as a fitness major, which sounds a lot like gym, but my bet is it has lots of “queering” and race stuff to it. Pointless majors tend to go hard for the crazy.

Another interesting tidbit is the fact that zoology has just about disappeared as a college major. It looks like the annual numbers are in the hundreds now. Maybe colleges have re-branded it as something cooler. Biology has not had a ton of growth over the last few decades either, so maybe not. It does suggest that young people no longer have an interest in the natural world. My guess is the number of young people experiencing the natural world is at an all-time low. Kids are not into hunting, fishing or farming.

The volume of business majors is the eye opener. Greg asked in his post what readers thought was the least valuable degree. That’s a loaded question, but objectively business has to be on the list. Most of the course work is stuff you never need in the business world. Accounting courses are useful, but few kids retain any of it. The math courses should be helpful, but many business majors never take more than the minimum of math required for graduation. The SAT scores for business majors explain the popularity.

The truth is, college is a major waste of time and money for most of the students. Only 59% of students graduate from college in six years. Some fraction of the rest go back and get their credential, but by that point it has lost its market value. This assumes it has a market value. A Ivy League diploma still carries weight. A Stanford degree opens secret doors that most don’t know exist, but in the case of the elite, it is not the degree so much as the connections. Mixing with tomorrow’s rulers is the real value of the degree.

Outside of STEM fields, it is hard to judge the value of a college degree. The constant refrain from the college industrial complex is that college graduates earn eleventy billion more in their lifetime, compared to non-graduates. There a lot of fun with numbers in those studies. People with “some college” tend to earn about the same as people with four-year degrees, suggesting IQ is the real issue here. If you are bright enough to get into college, you are as bright as the people who get out of college with a degree.

The only way to measure the value of a diploma is on a case by case situation. If your goal is to be an engineer, then you need the paper. On the other hand, if you are walking out of college with $80,000 in debt, by the time you pay off the loans, the real cost is 30% more in interest and opportunity cost. Your lifetime earnings probably justify that initial investment. On the other hand, if your goal is to be a medieval folklorist, you’re probably better off playing a lot of Dungeons & Dragons or World of Warcraft.

All that aside, the college rackets are another example of how social trust has declined in America over the generations. There’s little doubt now that colleges prey on the angst of middle-class families. The declining value of a college diploma corresponds with the skyrocketing cost of getting it. It is a bust out, the sort of thing predators do to people they view as strangers. Just as the college campus is a collection of grifters pretending to be colleagues and academics, America is a land of strangers pretending to be citizens.

Guest Post by The Zman via The Burning Platform
10 January 2018

Sanctuary stuff


(Politicians) have cold, expressionless faces, which imply a sharp, unbiased form of thinking, but their unconscious minds are touched by other problems. Welfare is often much more a subject of hate than of love and sympathy. One’s agenda, pride, and prestige can play a far greater role than pity for the poor victim. The displaced persons and the people of the devastated and underdeveloped countries are very much aware of this fact. They do not like the role in which fate has cast them; they have to play the double role of the eternal victim who is not only the victim of politics and war, but also of the often arrogant provider of charity. In fact, the representatives at the receiving end of these deals resent any offer made to their country. Everybody wants to be the generous “uncle from America, the ‘Land of the Free’.”

[…]

Somewhere something has gone wrong, and things have gotten out of hand. The will of nations and people to understand one another seems to be paralyzed, and mutual fear and suspicion have been built up by the fantasies of mythical ideologies warring against one another. Moreover, tomorrow only the tails of the fighting dogs may be all that remain.

[…]

Administrative bureaucrats today cannot handle their jobs adequately within the limits of the simple knowledge of people and nations that served governments in former years. If our leaders cannot take into account the irrational forces in themselves and in other people and nations, they may easily be swept off into the maelstrom of mass emotions. If they cannot learn to recognize that their private or official conduct often reflects their prejudices and irrationalities, they will not be able to cope with the often-unexpected prejudices of others. If they are, for instance, not sensitive to the paradoxical strategy hidden behind the misleading Aesopian language of totalitarians, they will not be able to counter the cold war of the mind.

Excerpts from “The Rape of the Mind: The Psychology of Thought Control, Menticide, and Brainwashing” (1956). Joost A. M. Meerloo, M.D.


See Also

Primate Behavior – Social Structure

In February 2015, Obama warned workers at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement: implement (illegal) executive amnesty, or else.


As it has become more and more obvious, “Sanctuary cities” are Orwellian nonsense writ large. There is no safety, there is no security, and they undermine the very concept of city, which exists to serve and protect … resident citizens. In evolving dystopian urban centers across the country, the very concept of “city” has been notoriously abused. Chicago, along with Los Angeles and New York City, among others, are brazenly announcing their sanctuary city status. As for their resident Citizen’s, they are to be damned.

The real solution to legal immigration is a simple one, if immigrants want to stay in America legally, they must properly apply for U.S. citizenship and follow the Rules and Laws of their new country. They will have freedom and liberty, and every “right” to prosper, or else to suffer the consequences of their bad choices and actions.

Why is this so politically difficult to understand?

Oh wait … The Center For American Progress (CAP) Action Fund circulated a memo on Monday calling illegal immigrants brought here at a young age — so-called “Dreamers” — a “critical component of the Democratic Party’s future electoral success.” – Plan To Use Foreigners To Influence American Election Outcomes