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“I’m not saying it’s aliens, but …”

2017/07/15

Germany (and Europe) reaping the whirlwind of infectious diseases admitted to the country along with the migrants

A record 1.25million asylum seekers arrived in the EU during 2015 – more than double the 564,000 who arrived in 2014 – and these figures are likely to be the tip of the iceberg because they cover only official claims. It is now mid-summer 2017.

Needy welfare colonists from throughout the Middle East and Africa often show up with nothing but the clothes on their backs — and the culture in their heads, and ravenous Third World diseases in their bodies, which often include “superbugs.” Many of these superbugs – such as MRSA, STDs, salmonella and certain strains of ecoli – are rapidly becoming untreatable with antibiotics.

HIV, tuberculosis, Shigella, scabies, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, salmonella, E. coli, Chagas disease, and all the rest make great metaphors for the longer-lasting figurative diseases being imported, such as Islam, terrorism, poverty, and social strife.

Louse-borne relapsing fever (LBRF): During the past two years, at least 48 people in Germany were diagnosed with LBRF, a disease that was unheard of in the country before the migration crisis in 2015, according to the RKI report. The disease, which is transmitted by clothing lice, has been prevalent among migrants from East Africa who have been travelling for months to reach Germany on a single set of clothes. “We had all forgotten about LBRF,” said Hans Jäger, a Munich-based doctor. “It has a mortality rate of up to 40% if it is not recognized and not treated with antibiotics. The symptoms are like in malaria: fever, headache, skin rash.”

Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB): The effect of migration within the European Union/European Economic Area on the distribution of tuberculosis, 2007 to 2013 Immigration from tuberculosis (TB) high-incidence countries is known to contribute notably to the TB burden in low-incidence countries. However, the effect of migration enabled by the free movement of persons within the European Union (EU)/European Economic Area (EEA) on TB notification has not been analysed. We analysed TB surveillance data from 29 EU/EEA countries submitted for the years 2007-2013 to The European Surveillance System. We used place of birth and nationality as proxy indicators for native, other EU/EEA and non-EU/EEA origin of the TB cases and analysed the characteristics of the subgroups by origin. From 2007-2013, a total of 527 467 TB cases were reported, of which 129 781 (24.6%) were of foreign origin including 12 566 (2.4%) originating from EU/EEA countries other than the reporting country. The countries reporting most TB cases originating from other EU/EEA countries were Germany and Italy […]

Lassa fever: In February 2016, a patient who had been infected in Togo, West Africa, was treated and died in Germany. After his death, a Lassa virus infection was confirmed in another person who had professional contact with the corpse of the deceased. The person was treated at an isolation facility and survived the disease. This was the first documented transmission of the Lassa virus in Germany.

Sindbis and Inkoo viruses:  Mosquito-borne viruses have a widespread distribution across the globe and are known to pose serious threats to human and animal health. The maintenance and dissemination of these viruses in nature are driven through horizontal and vertical transmission. In the temperate climate of northern Sweden, there is a dearth of knowledge on whether mosquito-borne viruses that occur are transmitted transovarially. To gain a better understanding of mosquito-borne virus circulation and maintenance, mosquito larvae were sampled in northern Sweden during the 1st and 2nd year after a large outbreak of Ockelbo disease in 2013 caused by Sindbis virus (SINV).

Dengue fever: Nearly a thousand people were diagnosed with dengue fever, a mosquito-borne tropical disease, in Germany during 2016. This is up 25% from 2014, when 755 people were diagnosed with the disease.

Malaria: The number of people diagnosed with malaria jumped sharply in 2014 (1,007) and 2015 (1,063), but declined slightly in 2016 (970). Most of those affected contracted the disease in Africa, particularly from Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria and Togo.

Candida auris: Candida auris is a globally emerging multidrug resistant fungal pathogen causing nosocomial transmission. We report an ongoing outbreak of C. auris in a London cardio-thoracic center between April 2015 and July 2016. This is the first report of C. auris in Europe and the largest outbreak so far. We describe the identification, investigation and implementation of control measures. The infection, which often spreads in hospitals and other health care settings, can invade the ear canal, urine and bloodstream.

Echinococcosis: Between 2014 and 2016, more than 200 people in Germany have been diagnosed with echinococcosis, a tapeworm infection. This represents in an increase of around 30%. Those affected contracted the disease in Afghanistan, Bulgaria, Greece, Kosovo, Iraq, Macedonia, Morocco, Syria and Turkey.

Diphtheria: Between 2014 and 2016, more than 30 people in Germany have been diagnosed with diphtheria. Those affected contracted the disease in Ethiopia, Eritrea, Libya, Sri Lanka and Thailand.

Scabies: Between 2013 and 2016, the number of people diagnosed with scabies in North Rhine-Westphalia jumped by nearly 3,000%.

Gatestone has a very informative piece this morning, thanks to reader Cathy for sending it my way.

As you read this story, do NOT forget that refugees entering the US are being permitted entry even if they have TB.  We learned just this week that the state of Minnesota was financially strapped as its health system attempts to cope with infectious diseases in its migrant community.

So although this story involves Germany, you, Americans are not immune!

Just like in Germany the reason you don’t hear about the diseases in the refugee flow to America is because authorities are “downplaying the threat in an effort to avoid fueling anti-immigration sentiments.”

And, as I have said repeatedly if Islamic terrorism doesn’t worry you, this should…..


Germany: Infectious Diseases Spreading as Migrants Settle In

A failed asylum seeker from Yemen who was given sanctuary at a church in northern Germany to prevent him from being deported has potentially infected more than 50 German children with a highly contagious strain of tuberculosis.

The man, who was sheltered at a church in Bünsdorf between January and May 2017, was in frequent contact with the children, some as young as three, who were attending a day care center at the facility. He was admitted to a hospital in Rendsburg in June and subsequently diagnosed with tuberculosis — a disease which only recently has reentered the German consciousness.

Local health authorities say that in addition to the children, parents and teachers as well as parishioners are also being tested for the disease, which can develop months or even years after exposure. It remains unclear if the man received the required medical exams when he first arrived in Germany, or if he is one of the hundreds of thousands of migrants who have slipped through the cracks.

The tuberculosis scare has cast a renewed spotlight on the increased risk of infectious diseases in Germany since Chancellor Angela Merkel allowed in around two million migrants from Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

[….]

The incidence of Hepatitis B, for example, has increased by 300% during the last three years, according to the RKI. The number of reported cases in Germany was 3,006 in 2016, up from 755 cases in 2014. Most of the cases are said to involve unvaccinated migrants from Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria. The incidence of measles in Germany jumped by more than 450% between 2014 and 2015, while the number of cases of chicken pox, meningitis, mumps, rubella and whooping cough were also up. Migrants also accounted for at least 40% of the new cases of HIV/AIDS identified in Germany since 2015, according to a separate RKI report.

The RKI statistics may be just the tip of the iceberg. The number of reported cases of tuberculosis, for example, was 5,915 in 2016, up from 4,488 cases in 2014, an increase of more than 30% during that period. Some doctors, however, believe that the actual number of cases of tuberculosis is far higher and have accused the RKI of downplaying the threat in an effort to avoid fueling anti-immigration sentiments.

Read it all here.

Original posted by Ann Corcoran

14 July 2017
Refugee Resettlement Watch (edited)

See Also

Army of Exotic Diseases Invades Europe Along With Refugees

https://i0.wp.com/milspecmonkey.com/amusement/liberian/african-militia-bride.jpg

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